DELONGHI DINAMICA – NOT HEATING

This is a little single thermoblock coffee machine, that has a slightly different layout than the older Delonghi’s but the same old issue. So I thought I’d cover it in pictures as it looks so different. This will give you a quick idea of the solution and install confidence that you can repair this fault yourself.

ALLWAYS BE CAUTIOUS WHEN DOING THIS ELECTRICAL WORK. ELECTRICITY HAS NO FRIENDS, UNPLUG THIS APPLIANCE AND DONT BE AN IDIOT WHEN COMPLETING THE DIY REPAIR. ITS NOT MY JOB TO DETERMINE IF YOU ARE BREAKING THE LAW WHERE YOU ARE LOCATED OR TO DETERMINE IF YOU ARE TOO RECKLESS TO DO THIS JOB. CAUSE I DONT KNOW IF YOU ARE OR NOT. BUT ASK YOURSELF IF YOU REALLY WANT TO DO THIS BEFORE BEGINNING?

Ok what is the fault?- you turn the coffee machine on and the red heating symbol flashes, but nothing happens, just silence for an eternity in which you realize, the coffee machine is not right today. The world as you know it has ended. Eventually it times out to what we know in Delonghi circles as “The General Alarm”.

The heating flag flashed forever and ever – you feel like crying!

Ok you head is spinning but this is simple. First thing I do is put a Watt Meter on the machine and note if its drawing current. No its not drawing much current at all. You may feel that the machine is cold. There is no heating going on at all. The machine is lying to you.
So now with the machine unplugged and the side panels off we start by determining;
1. Are the thermal fuses ok. Now this model has the thermal fuses hidden behind the thermoblock, So its much easier to find where the thermoblock element wires attach to the board and meter to determine if we have any resistance at all. I did this and I got Zip, nothing, no ohms. So my next step was to meter the element on its own. This will point the finger at the element or the fuses. Why did I do this and not just go straight to the element and fuses, well I if I have got a resistance reading it would have told me the element and fuses were all ok and saved me having to pull half the machine apart. Which I now have to do.

Metering the 2 element wires, after disconnecting them from the control board. Zero ohms, I have an issue with the thermal fuses and/or element.


2. Metered the element and I got 40 odd ohms, so the element is ok.

Here I am metering the element to determine its status

Ok Now I have to pull the front of the machine off and the steam tap etc and remove the boiler and turn it inside out to get at the fuses. Both thermal fuses have gone open circuit. So this tells me we have had a significant thermal event.
ANYTIME A THERMAL FUSE HAS GONE OPEN CIRCUIT, SUSPECT A THERMAL EVENT.
Anyway it was at this point I replaced both thermal fuses. I cut them off and resolder in new ones. Its easier than rewiring the loom.

The thermal block exposed showing the 2 thermal fuses

Ok so now the thermal fuses are replaced, we plug it in and test right, NO WRONG. Now it is time to replace the Triac. Never just replace a thermal fuse, especially 2 and just think you are done. It violates the rule, the one written in capitals above.
Because I am old and wise I know that this has the signature of a faulty triac written all over it. Now you are probably now thinking, its easier to take the machine to the repair guy. Yes if you want to give up, but how are you going to feel putting this machine back together and giving up. I have little old ladies who can do this job. Nothing against little old ladies as all. Its you I’m getting at.

Ok youre still with me. You are either brave or stupid, hopefully not both. Remove the board and label the main connections. Or take a photo. With the board out you need to de-solder the triac. You can buy a replacement here. Its not hard, if you don’t have a soldering iron, you should. You may want to go to youtube and learn how to desolder a component.
Once its done replace the triac and make sure you get some heat paste from me as well.

The heating element triac removed. Don’t worry about testing it, they are cheap enough to just replace. It’s a safe assumption its faulty with both thermal fuses having failed.

Now you can reinstall the board and test. When testing I like to have the machine plugged into a Wattmeter so I can see that its switching the element on and off correctly. Cause if its not switching the element off, its going to get very hot and blow the thermal fuses all over again. Hopefully you were successful, if not and the thermal fuses blew again, I can tell you with certainty its not the Triac. I told you to take to the Repair Guy.

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